Necessary Evil (Milkweed Triptych, #3)

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  • Paperback
  • 472 pages
  • Necessary Evil (Milkweed Triptych, #3)
  • Ian Tregillis
  • English
  • 10 November 2017
  • 035650171X

About the Author: Ian Tregillis

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Necessary Evil (Milkweed Triptych, #3) book, this is one of the most wanted Ian Tregillis author readers around the world.


Necessary Evil (Milkweed Triptych, #3) The history of the Twentieth Century has been shaped by a secret conflict between technology and magic When a twisted Nazi scientist devised a way to imbue ordinary humans with supernatural abilities to walk through walls, throw fire and see the future his work became the prized possession of first the Third Reich, then the Soviet Army Only Britain s warlocks, and the dark magics they yield, have successfully countered the threat posed by these superhuman armies.But for decades, this conflict has been manipulated by Gretel, the mad seer And now her long plan has come to fruition And with it, a danger vastly greater than anything the world has known Now British Intelligence officer Raybould Marsh must make a last ditch effort to change the course of history if his nation, and those he loves, are to survive. Best Read Necessary Evil (Milkweed Triptych, #3) Author Ian Tregillis For Kindle ePUB or eBook – passionbusiness.co.uk

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14 thoughts on “Necessary Evil (Milkweed Triptych, #3)

  1. Melissa McShane says:

    This third and final volume in the Milkweed Triptych was enjoyable, but ultimately a disappointment Tregillis continues to deliver on the fast paced action, and handles the rewriting of the timeline of Bitter Seeds and The Coldest War well With two Raybould Marshes running around, his decision to make Old Marsh s perspective first person and Young Marsh s third person kept the two narratives clearly separate Some of the suspense is lost when it becomes clear that this new timeline is our ac This third and final volume in the Milkweed Triptych was enjoyable, but ultimately a disappointment Tregillis continues to deliver on the fast paced action, and handles the rewriting of the timeline of Bitter Seeds and The Coldest War well With two Raybould Marshes running around, his decision to make Old Marsh s perspective first person and Young Marsh s third person kept the two narratives clearly separate Some of the suspense is lost when it becomes clear that this new timeline is our actual history, w...

  2. Sarah says:

    The plot of Necessary Evil is just as fast paced and intricate as all the other books In fact, with the time jump going on, I d say it s evenintricate than the other books It s detailed and riveting Tregillis ends his series with one hell of a bang, but somehow that fits It s dark and atmospheric His characters are raw and real, but it s the details that really make Necessary Evil stand out It s those details that show Tregillis for the literary grandmaster that he truly is Necessar The plot of Necessary Evil is just as fast paced and intricate as all the other books In fact, with the time jump going on, I d say it s evenintricate than the other books It s detailed and riveting Tregillis ends his series with one hell of a bang, but somehow that fits It s dark and atmospheric His characters are raw and real, but it s th...

  3. Mir says:

    I hope I get this cover rather than this one Ideally, they will be reissued with covers that match.

  4. AndrewP says:

    After being disappointed by the ending of Book two, this one fully redeems the trilogy The story comes to a satisfying end and there is some excellent explanations to events that happened back in book one There were quite a few mysterious events in that book, but they are all explained here Some very clever writing indeed However, I still think book two could have ended better and not remind me of a Bobby Ewing Dallas moment If you enjoyed book one, then read books 2 and 3 It s well worth After being disappointed by the ending of Book two, this one fully redeems the trilogy The story comes to a satisfying end and there is some excellent explanations to events that happened back in book one There were quite a few mysterious events in that book, but they are all explained here Some very clever writing indeed However, I still think book two could have ended better and no...

  5. Corry Lee says:

    You know how sometimes you fall in love with a book say Tregillis first novel, Bitter Seeds You love the WWII spycraft, you love the action, the Nazi superheroes and the British warlocks You love the explosions and the way momentum is totally conserved And then you re afraid that the rest of the series might not live up to the awesomeness that was the first book Then you read book 2, The Coldest War, and it also totally rocks, but really, how likely is it that the third book in the series You know how sometimes you fall in love with a book say Tregillis first novel, Bitter Seeds You love the WWII spycraft, you love the action, the Nazi superheroes and the British warlocks You love the explosions and the way momentum is totally conserved And then you re afraid that the rest of the series might not live up to the awesomeness that was the first book Then you read book 2, The Coldest War, and it also totally rocks, but really, how likely is it that the third book in the...

  6. Thomas Stacey says:

    A solid end to an impressive trilogy Definitely going to get round to Tregillis next series soon, which involves robots And who doesn t love robots

  7. Paul Nelson says:

    Necessary Evil is the final instalment of the Milkweed Triptych trilogy, I must admit war novels are not my thing and usually I don t even consider picking one up This series however has some riveting aspects that are sheer genius, the first we encounter is the German technological advancement in the form of scientifically engineered supersoldiers with incredible abilities The second being the British answer to this supersoldier, the use of blood magic to communicate with the Eidolons, beings Necessary Evil is the final instalment of the Milkweed Triptych trilogy, I must admit war novels are not my thing and usually I don t even consider picking one up This series however has some riveting aspects that are sheer genius, the first we encounter is the German technological advancement in the form of scientifically engineered supersoldiers with incredible abilities The second being the British answer to this supersoldier, the use of blood magic to communicate with the Eidolons, beings that exist outside of reality This coupled with some amazing characters on both sides of the war and a clever intricate plot that never c...

  8. Paul Genesse says:

    Review of Necessary Evil by Ian TregillisAWESOME CONCLUSION TO A BRILLIANT SERIES No spoilers I really loved this series and it was fun to read the third and concluding novel of the Milkweed Triptych, Necessary Evil by Ian Tregillis The plot threads were nicely tied up, and I was constantly surprised with the direction of the book.The first two, Bitter Seeds and Coldest War were amazingly good see my reviews of both and Necessary Evil kept up the tension I won t ruin the first two books here Review of Necessary Evil by Ian TregillisAWESOME CONCLUSION TO A BRILLIANT SERIES No spoilers I really loved this series and it was fun to read the third and concluding novel of the Milkweed Triptych, Necessary Evil by Ian Tregillis The plot threads were nicely tied up, and I was constantly surprised with the direction of the book.The first two, Bitter Seeds and Coldest War were amazingly good see my reviews of both and Necessary Evil kept up the tension I won t ruin the first two books here, as the beauty of the series relies heavily on not knowing what s coming Overall, I think the first two books had meworried about the characters and their fates, but Necessary Evil was excellent I still never knew what was going to happen.Gretel, the chara...

  9. Jacqie says:

    This is still one of the most original concepts I ve come across in quite some time I was very excited to see what would happen when Marsh is sent back in time, as has been foreshadowed since the very first book However, I didn t get quite the book I expected.There was a lot of unrequited love to deal with that I wasn t expecting Old Marsh as I ll refer to the Marsh who was sent back from the 60 s to the 40 s becomes obsessed with his wife, Liv He is still trying to change the future, but This is still one of the most original concepts I ve come across in quite some time I was very excited to see what would happen when Marsh is sent back in time, as has been foreshadowed since the very first book However, I didn t get quite the book I expected.There was a lot of unrequited love to deal with that I wasn t expecting Old Marsh as I ll refer to the Marsh who was sent back from the 60 s to the 40 s becomes obsessed with his wife, Liv He is still trying to change the future, but he sends his younger self off to do the hard stuff while he hangs around his old home mooning over his family I wasn t especially fond of that relationship in the previous books, and I wasn t prepared for the 1st person POV of Old Mar...

  10. Vojislav says:

    I liked Bitter Seeds , although it was a bit rough I thoroughly enjoyed The Coldest War , despite its cliffhanger ending I had great expectations when I picked up Necessary Evil , but it ended up being a considerable disappointment in an otherwise promising series.Ultimately, it s pretty pointless to review the finale of a series Either you ve read the rest of the series or you haven t If you haven t, go read someone s review for the first book If you have, then you ve most likely alread I liked Bitter Seeds , although it was a bit rough I thoroughly enjoyed The Coldest War , despite its cliffhanger ending I had great expectations when I picked up Necessary Evil , but it ended up being a considerable disappointment in an otherwise promising series.Ultimately, it s pretty pointless to review the finale of a series Either you ve read the rest of the series or you haven t If you haven t, go read someone s review for the first book If you have, then you ve most likely already decided to buy this book At any rate, I don t feel compelled to avoid spoilers in my review, so consider yourself warned view spoiler Let me start by saying that this is by no means a bad book I ve read my share of atrocious books and I was even guilty of having enjoyed them without realizing how bad they were until I decided to reread them Necessary Evil is not one of those books It s disappointing and it could have been a lot b...

  11. David says:

    WARNING Great big spoilers for the first two books in the Milkweed trilogy.In the first book of the Milkweed trilogy, British secret agent Raybould Marsh and his poncy toff friend Will Beauclerk tried to find a way to fight supersoldiers created by Nazi science The solution was the top secret Milkweed project gathering Britain s warlocks, who can bargain with cosmic horrors called Eidolons, they used magic to destroy the Reich s armies and counter the supermen, at the cost of sacrificing thei WARNING Great big spoilers for the first two books in the Milkweed trilogy.In the first book of the Milkweed trilogy, British secret agent Raybould Marsh and his poncy toff friend Will Beauclerk tried to find a way to fight supersoldiers created by Nazi science The solution was the top secret Milkweed project gathering Britain s warlocks, who can bargain with cosmic horrors called Eidolons, they used magic to destroy the Reich s armies and counter the supermen, at the cost of sacrificing their own citizens.The second book, The Coldest War, set in the 1960s, showed a Soviet Union in control of the supersoldie...

  12. Mark says:

    My enduring fondness for both time travel and alternate versions of history is probably all that saves this concluding book of the trilogy from a heap of unmitigated disappointment.The problems for me were largely technical in nature, the result of a narrative that finds itself frequently switching tenses and perspectives I guess this was the necessary outcome from the way the story developed, in that it required both the perspective of the older and younger alternate Marsh and the easiest way My enduring fondness for both time travel and alternate versions of history is probably all that saves this concluding book of the trilogy from a heap of unmitigated disappointment.The problems for me were largely technical in nature, the result of a narrative that finds itself frequently switching tenses and perspectives I guess this was the necessary outcome from the way the story developed, in that it required both the perspective of the older and younger alternate Marsh and the easiest way to differentiate between the two was to have one be in first person and one to be in third person I get that, but when you take that and combine it with weird present tense occasional stream of consciousness Gretel interludes, it makes for a jarring reading experience I hate stream of consciousness in any book and this was no exception Me...

  13. edifanob says:

    Athan worthy final book to end the Milkweed Triptych.A book with a stubborn character who is full of love, passion, determination, endurance and will.The whole series is one of the best alternate history series I read so far.

  14. Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books) says:

    Non stop adventure and intrigue with very poignant human drama Like a good spy adventure novel with a healthy dose of weird supernatural sci fi fiction thrown in.Overall rating 4.5 5.0 stars.Reviewed for Bitten by Books