The Portable Medieval Reader

Ý The Portable Medieval Reader☆ By ✓ James Bruce Ross algebra – passionbusiness.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 690 pages
  • The Portable Medieval Reader
  • James Bruce Ross
  • English
  • 24 September 2018
  • 0140150463

About the Author: James Bruce Ross

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The Portable Medieval Reader In their introduction to this anthology, James Bruce Ross and Mary Martin McLaughlin remind us that no area of the past is dead if we are alive to it The variety, the complexity, the sheer humanity of the middle ages live most meaningfully in their own authentic voices The Portable Medieval Reader assembles an entire chorus of those voices of kings, warriors, prelates, merchants, artisans, chroniclers, and scholars that together convey a lively, intimate impression of a world that might otherwise seem immeasurably alien All the aspects and strata of medieval society are represented here the life of monasteries and colleges, the codes of knigthood, the labor of peasants and the privileges of kings There are contemporary accounts of the persecution of Jews and heretics, of the Crusades in the Holy Land, of courtly pageants, popular uprisings, and the first trade missions to Cathay We find Chaucer, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Saint Francis of Assisi, Thomas Aquinas and Abelard alongside a host of lesser known writers, discoursing on all the arts, knowledge and speculation of their time The result, according to the Columbia Record, is a broad and eminetly readable cross section of source history and literatureas rich and varied as a stained glass window. Free Download [ The Portable Medieval Reader ] Author [ James Bruce Ross ] For Kindle ePUB or eBook – passionbusiness.co.uk

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10 thoughts on “The Portable Medieval Reader

  1. Robert says:

    On one level, nothing beats this going straight to the source, reading what the ancients had to say about their lives, their world, their thoughts Bernard of Gui describing the Inquisition, not as someone trying to justify it to posterity but simply as a leader of that movement describing what it was he did or Roger Bacon laying out the principles of what we would come to call the scientific method while at the same time expressing his own deep faith, and his certainty that this method he wa On one level, nothing beats this going straight to the source, reading what the ancients had to say about their lives, their world, their thoughts Bernard of G...

  2. Jeremy says:

    The selections in this collection are broad enough that anyone interested in the High Middle Ages will find something to enjoy However, the scope of the anthology is also a drawback readers will find passages or entire sections that likely do not interest them The major weakness of the text though is the lack of introd...

  3. Drew says:

    Let me say that my choice of 2 stars isa reflection of my own interest in this book and not necessarily of the book itself I picked it up from a used bookstore since I was kind of approaching the medieval period from two sides forward from the ancient world and ever backward from the 17th century I figured it was time to delve a little deeper After reading these selections, I can see my interests are elsewhere However, there were things I learned, including some neat nuggets, and I w Let me say that my choice of 2 stars isa reflection...

  4. Jeff Crompton says:

    A wildly varied collection of writings from the Middle Ages history, philosophy, household hints, poetry, travel writing, science, etc The selections range from the fascinating to the boring to the exasperating I devoured some and skimmed others But I certainly understand the Medieval period better now For example, I certainly was not aware, but should have been, I suppose, of the extent that life and politics, not just theology, revolved around the Catholic church The recipe for eels r A wildly varied collection of writings from the Middle Ages history, philosophy, household hints, poetry, travel writing, science, etc The selections range from the fascinating to the boring to the exasperating I devoured some and skimmed others But I certainly understand the Medieval period better now For example, I certainly was not aware, but should have been, I suppose, of the extent that life and politics, not just theology, revolved around the Catholic church The recipe for eels reversed is not to be missed, nor are The Rules of Courtly Love XX A man in love is always apprehensive The juxtaposition of writings about the Crusades by crusaders, Arabs, and Greeks is amusing each group thought the others stupid and barbaric.The philosophical writi...

  5. Wanda says:

    The book is a selection of excerpts from various original documents on just about every aspect of European medieval life, although most of the excerpts concern England, Italy or France and a bit of Germany and the Holy Land The selections were of uneven interest to me personally, but all held at least some attraction and after finishing all 690 pages of the Penguin edition I read, I had a much clearer understanding of the world as it was some 40 generations ago As the lucid and informative Int The book is a selection of excerpts from various ...

  6. Kajah says:

    This eclectic collection of text from the medieval times is at turns fascinating, funny, horrible, and illuminating Notes upon first encountering some Turks or something like that tittle accounts a skirmish of Franks with certain Saracens and their combination of disdain and admiration, and complementary to this is the Upon First Encounters with a Frank by an Islamic author both of these excerpts are fun, personal enlighte...

  7. Holly says:

    A great broad introduction to the way people lived and thought during the Middle Ages in a collection of writings and excerpts by the people who lived during this time Most enjoyable was reading about the barbarous Irish and then reading a couple diffe...

  8. sologdin says:

    these Viking readers are usually too ambitious, attempting to pack in massive amounts in limited space A for effort, I guess, but the selections are too cursory for anything other than a general introduction.

  9. Russell says:

    Excellent collection of quotable quotes from the era of Chivalry, a little before and a wee bit after as well Looking for Guido Cavalcanti He s here How about Lambert of Hersfeld Look no further

  10. Cate Neuhauser says:

    Some of the sources were amazing, others were boring and unneeded